Niobraran Landscape 1: T20 & 21 R55N83W, ½” x 6 ½” x 6 ½”, 2016

Niobraran Landscape 2: T1R53N82W, 1” x 6 ½” x 6 ½”, 2016

Niobraran Landscape 3: T4R53N81W, ¾” x 5 ¾” x 5 ¾”, 2016

Niobraran Landscape 4: T18R53N81W, 1” x 5 ¾” x 5 ¾”, 2016

Niobraran Landscape 5: T15R53N81W, 1” x 5 ¾” x 5 ¾”, 2016

Niobraran Landscape 6: T11R53N81W, 1” x 5 ½” x 5 ½”, 2016

Niobraran Landscape 8: T5R55N83W, 1 ¼” x 8 ½” x 8 ½”, 2016

Niobraran Landscape 9: T5R53N81W, 1 ¼” x 8 ½” x 8 ½”, 2016

Niobraran Landscape 10: T17R53N81W, 1 ½” x 8 ½” x 8 ½”, 2016

Niobraran Landscape 11: T24R53N81W, 1 ½” x 8 ½” x 8 ½”, 2016

Niobraran Landscape 14: T13R53N81W, 1 ½” x 8” x 8”, 2016

Mountain/Stream-Lineas, 2 ½” x 7 ½” x 7 ½”, 2016

Chorography: the art of mapping

As Ptolemy described it, chorography is an exploration of the intimate pieces of our world, as opposed to geography, which involves its entirety. It is a creative way of looking at, and mapping, small parts of our earth.

These pieces were created at an art residency at Ucross in Wyoming. This area, including much of the Midwest and west, was once underwater and was called the Niobraran Sea, better known as the Western Interior Seaway. The landscape has been shaped by water, or the lack of water, over many millennia.

I am enchanted by this landscape, and how within it people have carved out a life. Many people identify strongly with the ocean, but as a land-locked westerner, the prairie landscape is my “ocean.”

Working on these intimate three-dimensional carved and modeled landscapes is an exercise in the process of discovery, of understanding how parts of the landscape connect, and help to shape the overall aesthetic of the land. The process reveals the practicality of human intervention into the landscape, and also the peculiar beauty of these shapes and forms created from the perspective of function over form.